Posts Tagged ‘Disruptive innovation’

“I’m your friend,” Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter, MBA, PhD, told a sometimes skeptical audience during his keynote address at the ASA’s annual meeting, ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016. “I’m trying to help you see a better way forward, and avoid the bad outcomes that may happen if we don’t transform healthcare.”

Porter is a well-known economist, an expert on business strategy, and the author of the book Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results. In his speech to the ASA, he argued the case for redefining health care by making “value for the patient” the unifying purpose, and he urged anesthesiologists to forget pay for volume.

“How should anesthesiologists engage in bundled payments?” Porter asked. “Jump on them!”

Explaining that he has spent the past 15 years immersed in studying health care delivery, Porter said that he looks on health care as one of the world’s “most fundamental and intractable problems.” He asked listeners to think again about anesthesiology practice, and its role and responsibilities in the future of health care.

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“Fighting against those who want to change things is a futile strategy,” declared Jason Hwang, MD, MBA, keynote speaker at the opening ceremonies of the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ annual meeting in New Orleans on Saturday, October 11. “You can’t defend a profession by putting up regulatory and payment barriers to stop the barbarians at the gates.”

Dr. Hwang is a co-author of  The Innovator’s Prescription: A Disruptive Solution for Health Care, the winner of the 2010 Book of the Year award from the American College of Healthcare Executives. An expert on the subject of disruptive innovation, Dr. Hwang told the audience of anesthesiologists from more than 90 countries that the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) concept offers an integrated solution to healthcare that can help the profession of anesthesiology adapt, survive, and prosper.

He used the example of Apple Inc. to illustrate how a company can thrive while other huge competitors failed because they yielded to “the irresistible temptation to keep doing what they already did best.”

Faster horses, bigger hard drives

If Henry Ford had asked customers what they wanted, Dr. Hwang said, they would have answered “faster horses”. If you asked people what they wanted from their computers 10 years ago, they would have answered bigger hard drives, more memory, and faster processors. Nobody would have said they wanted a phone. But Apple redefined the business with smartphones and tablets that created their own market, and Apple controls the entire integrated product.

Anesthesiology’s chief problem has been complacency with the status quo, Dr. Hwang said. Profitability has been greatest in the operating room, while the areas of preoperative and postoperative care were ripe for encroachment by hospitalists and other practitioners.
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New research just out in the journal Psychology and Aging says pessimists live longer and healthier lives. If this is true, then contemplating the future of anesthesiology ought to make us immortal, because our professional prospects don’t look bright.  As we teach residents to do what we’ve always done, shouldn’t we ask ourselves honestly if we’re training them for a future that doesn’t exist?

Especially here in California, it seems likely that our predominantly MD-provided, fee-for-service practice of anesthesiology will not survive indefinitely, and perhaps not for long.  We can blame the reelection of President Obama and the passage of the Affordable Care Act if we like, but the reality is that market forces were eventually going to catch up with us whether or not Mitt Romney went to the White House.

In a way, we’re the victims of our own success; we’ve made anesthesia so safe that everyone thinks there’s nothing to it. But that’s exactly the point.  Technology has indeed made anesthesia much safer.  When I started learning anesthesia, pulse oximetry and end-tidal CO2 monitoring were new to the market, unproven, and scarce. Now they’re everywhere. We fear the difficult airway less now that we have video laryngoscopes readily at hand.

Since technology is so much better, why do so many of us still believe that every case requires the costly expertise of a board-certified anesthesiologist?  Read the Full Article

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