We’re very fortunate in anesthesiology. We’re seldom the physicians who have to face families with the terrible news that a patient has died from a gunshot wound.

But all too often we’re right there in the operating room for the frantic attempts to repair the bullet hole in the heart before it stops beating, or the blast wound to the shattered liver before the patient bleeds to death.

Despite all the skills of everyone in the operating room – surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, technicians – and all the blood in the blood bank, we’re not always successful. A death on the OR table is a traumatic event and a defeat; we remember it decades later.

So yes, this is our lane too. Memories haunt me of the times when mine was the last voice a gunshot victim heard on this earth, telling him he was about to go to sleep as he went under anesthesia for the last-ditch, futile attempt to save him.

I use the pronoun “he” intentionally, as every one of those cases in my professional life has been a young man. My experience is representative; most gunshot victims aren’t the random targets of mass shootings. They are overwhelmingly male (89 percent), under the age of 30 (61 percent), and over half are from the lowest income quartile.

The National Rifle Association (NRA) is way off base in telling physicians to mind their own business as it did in its infamous November 7 tweet. Human life is our business. Pediatricians have every right to remind parents that gun security, and keeping guns out of the hands of children, are vital to their well-being right up there with getting them vaccinated.

At my house, we’ve always kept our guns padlocked in a safe that our children couldn’t have broken into with a crowbar. We’re not NRA members, but we enjoy going to a shooting range on occasion. I learned gun safety during my officer training in the Army Reserve Medical Corps. My husband and I are firmly in the category of gun-owners who take both the right and the responsibility with the utmost seriousness.

Physician opinions on gun control and gun ownership vary just as much as the opinions of the rest of the population. What doesn’t vary is our collective sense of responsibility for public health and our support for better, more readily available, mental health care.

The solutions to America’s horrific rate of gun-related deaths aren’t easy or obvious. But the NRA isn’t helping matters with its thoughtless and incendiary social media message.

8 COMMENTS

Charese Pelham

I agree with Dr. Perona.

Rita

Dr. Sibert is not a surgeon, she is a fantastic anesthesiologist, caring gun owner and thoughtful human being

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Keep calm and give the Ancef

A true allergic reaction is one of the most terrifying events in medicine. A child or adult who is highly allergic to bee stings or peanuts, for instance, can die within minutes without a life-saving epinephrine injection.

But one of the most commonly reported allergies — to penicillin — often isn’t a true allergy at all. The urgent question that faces physicians every day in emergency rooms and operating rooms is this:  How can we know whether or not the patient is truly allergic to penicillin, and what should we give when antibiotic treatment is indicated?

It’s time for us to stop making these decisions out of fear, and look squarely at the evidence. Withholding the right antibiotic may be exactly the wrong thing to do for our patients. Here’s why.

Can’t we just prescribe a different antibiotic?

When we hear that patients are “PCN-allergic”, we’ve been trained from our first days as medical students to avoid every drug in the penicillin family. We’re also taught to avoid antibiotics called “cephalosporins”, which include common medications like Keflex. This is because penicillin and cephalosporin molecules have some structural features in common, raising the odds that a patient allergic to one may also be allergic to the other.

What does it matter? Can’t physicians just prescribe a different antibiotic?

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2 COMMENTS

Joseph Myers, MD

Thanks, Karen. I'll take your article with me to the OR.
Karen, thanks for this. This hoary myth has been hard to debunk; no one ever thinks of the harm caused by needless substitution with less-effective drugs.

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Tech entrepreneur Josh Linkner gave the keynote speech at this year’s ASA annual meeting in San Francisco, delivering a rousing talk designed to leave the audience inspired with a can-do attitude and new hope for the survival of anesthesiology as a profession.

It should be a good talk; Mr. Linkner clearly has given it plenty of times. According to national speakers’ bureaus, the 48-year-old “innovation and creativity speaker” and “New York Times bestselling author” charges from $30,000 to $50,000 a pop for his keynote addresses, and guarantees a “fast-moving and entertaining” experience for listeners with “real takeaway value.”

So what did we get for our money?

We learned from Mr. Linkner about five “big ideas” that he believes are the keys to driving innovation in any field:

Every barrier can be penetrated

Video killed the radio star

Change the rules to get the jewels

Seek the unexpected

Fall seven times. Stand eight.

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1 COMMENT

Steven Jacobs

Adding insult to injury, when Quaid made his video appearance at the 2013 meeting he was also actively involved in supporting CA Proposition 46, misleadingly named the "Troy and Alana Pack Patient Safety Act of 2014". Quaid appeared in ads promoting Prop 46 because it required physicians to consult the state prescription database before prescribing controlled substances, and also required alcohol and drug testing of physicians. Quaid failed to mention in his ads that Pro 46 also increased the cap on pain and ...Read More

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Watching and working in ASA officer election campaigns for the past several years has been a deeply unsettling experience.

The ASA’s officers today are outstanding anesthesiologists, dedicated to their profession and to the organization. But the process of electing them, from my viewpoint, is a dysfunctional endurance test, fraught with barriers to entry and hobbled by tradition.

Imagine a hybrid of ritualized Kabuki theater and a high-school campaign for homecoming queen, and you’d be close. And yet the results have binding effects on a 50,000-member, multimillion-dollar specialty society whose work affects the professional lives of all ASA members.

We need to reevaluate and redesign this system sooner rather than later for the health and long-term future of the organization. Here is a glimpse of some of the fundamental problems.

While in theory offices come open for election every year, in reality it’s taboo to challenge an incumbent officer.

There are no term limits. An incumbent officer can be reelected indefinitely. So anyone thinking about running for office has no certain knowledge of what year an office may become vacant.

People may announce their intention to run for a given office years in advance of when the office is likely to become vacant, with the intentional effect of discouraging anyone else from running in opposition. (Think of dogs marking their territory.)

The campaign process is prohibitively expensive at personal cost to the candidates, often involving travel to multiple state society meetings. The cost alone is a barrier to entry for younger physicians, as is the time away from work and family.

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7 COMMENTS

Dr Jef

Thank you for taking this up Karen. I appreciated your details of a process unknown to any who aren't or haven't been direct participants. I found myself asking not about Al Gore or other trifles, but about the Core Mission of the ASA. What DOES the ASA do in reality for me as the practicing Anesthesiologist? I've been both a member and non member. I've read the mission statement. I know what issues they talk about taking up. I've sat in many caucus ...Read More

Arthur

This was a very enlightening article. I’ve grown increasingly disenchanted with the ASA this year and worry that it is moving away from its member-centric roots. It’s interesting that you bring up the financial aspect of campaigning. I think anesthesiologists need organization and advocacy, but the ASA seems increasingly focused on corporate partnerships to bring in more money. Money is great for advocacy, but not if it compromises the organization’s commitment to its members. I can’t help but wonder how ...Read More

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For several years now, I’ve been the social media curmudgeon in medicine. In a 2011 New York Times op-ed titled “Don’t Quit This Day Job”, I argued that working part-time or leaving medicine goes against our obligation to patients and to the American taxpayers who subsidize graduate medical education to the tune of $15 billion per year.

But today, eight years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act, I’m more sympathetic to the physicians who are giving up on medicine by cutting back on their work hours or leaving the profession altogether. Experts cite all kinds of reasons for the malaise in American medicine:  burnout, user-unfriendly electronic health records, declining pay, loss of autonomy. I think the real root cause lies in our country’s worsening anti-intellectualism.

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4 COMMENTS

The cult of martyrdom in medicine, which insists on passing each generation's cross onto the next (weighed by heavier debt burdens), has gone from being considered an unhealthy but tolerated rite of passage to a dangerous hazing ritual. Add to this a new desire to enjoy quality of life by younger docs (The nerve! How dare they insist on knowing their children!) and you have a financial independence movement within medicine that is understandably appealing to many young graduates. Just prior to my clinical rotations in medical ...Read More
I do remember a lot of these times. I'm not happy about all the changes. Socially I'm very laid-back and informal but I think things at work should be more formal and professional. On the other hand, I don't spend any time longing for the past. Most of the changes are for the better. We focus on the patient experience more. We work as a team for better outcomes. Those old respected medical sages didn't really practice great medicine! ...Read More

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